1.1.2 Other Features

  • Redis in Action – Home
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Part 1: Getting Started
  • Part 2: Core concepts
  • 1.3.1 Voting on articles
  • 1.3.2 Posting and fetching articles
  • 1.3.3 Grouping articles
  • 4.2.1 Configuring Redis for replication
  • 4.2.2 Redis replication startup process
  • 4.2.3 Master/slave chains
  • 4.2.4 Verifying disk writes
  • 5.1 Logging to Redis
  • 5.2 Counters and statistics
  • 5.3 IP-to-city and -country lookup
  • 5.4 Service discovery and configuration
  • 5.1.1 Recent logs
  • 5.1.2 Common logs
  • 5.2.2 Storing statistics in Redis
  • 5.3.1 Loading the location tables
  • 5.3.2 Looking up cities
  • 5.4.1 Using Redis to store configuration information
  • 5.4.2 One Redis server per application component
  • 5.4.3 Automatic Redis connection management
  • 8.1.1 User information
  • 8.1.2 Status messages
  • 9.1.1 The ziplist representation
  • 9.1.2 The intset encoding for SETs
  • Chapter 10: Scaling Redis
  • Chapter 11: Scripting Redis with Lua
  • 10.1 Scaling reads
  • 10.2 Scaling writes and memory capacity
  • 10.3 Scaling complex queries
  • 10.2.2 Creating a server-sharded connection decorator
  • 10.3.1 Scaling search query volume
  • 10.3.2 Scaling search index size
  • 10.3.3 Scaling a social network
  • 11.1.1 Loading Lua scripts into Redis
  • 11.1.2 Creating a new status message
  • 11.2 Rewriting locks and semaphores with Lua
  • 11.3 Doing away with WATCH/MULTI/EXEC
  • 11.4 Sharding LISTs with Lua
  • 11.5 Summary
  • 11.2.1 Why locks in Lua?
  • 11.2.2 Rewriting our lock
  • 11.2.3 Counting semaphores in Lua
  • 11.4.1 Structuring a sharded LIST
  • 11.4.2 Pushing items onto the sharded LIST
  • 11.4.4 Performing blocking pops from the sharded LIST
  • A.1 Installation on Debian or Ubuntu Linux
  • A.2 Installing on OS X
  • B.1 Forums for help
  • B.4 Data visualization and recording
  • Buy the paperback
  • Redis in Action – Home
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Part 1: Getting Started
  • Part 2: Core concepts
  • 1.3.1 Voting on articles
  • 1.3.2 Posting and fetching articles
  • 1.3.3 Grouping articles
  • 4.2.1 Configuring Redis for replication
  • 4.2.2 Redis replication startup process
  • 4.2.3 Master/slave chains
  • 4.2.4 Verifying disk writes
  • 5.1 Logging to Redis
  • 5.2 Counters and statistics
  • 5.3 IP-to-city and -country lookup
  • 5.4 Service discovery and configuration
  • 5.1.1 Recent logs
  • 5.1.2 Common logs
  • 5.2.2 Storing statistics in Redis
  • 5.3.1 Loading the location tables
  • 5.3.2 Looking up cities
  • 5.4.1 Using Redis to store configuration information
  • 5.4.2 One Redis server per application component
  • 5.4.3 Automatic Redis connection management
  • 8.1.1 User information
  • 8.1.2 Status messages
  • 9.1.1 The ziplist representation
  • 9.1.2 The intset encoding for SETs
  • Chapter 10: Scaling Redis
  • Chapter 11: Scripting Redis with Lua
  • 10.1 Scaling reads
  • 10.2 Scaling writes and memory capacity
  • 10.3 Scaling complex queries
  • 10.2.2 Creating a server-sharded connection decorator
  • 10.3.1 Scaling search query volume
  • 10.3.2 Scaling search index size
  • 10.3.3 Scaling a social network
  • 11.1.1 Loading Lua scripts into Redis
  • 11.1.2 Creating a new status message
  • 11.2 Rewriting locks and semaphores with Lua
  • 11.3 Doing away with WATCH/MULTI/EXEC
  • 11.4 Sharding LISTs with Lua
  • 11.5 Summary
  • 11.2.1 Why locks in Lua?
  • 11.2.2 Rewriting our lock
  • 11.2.3 Counting semaphores in Lua
  • 11.4.1 Structuring a sharded LIST
  • 11.4.2 Pushing items onto the sharded LIST
  • 11.4.4 Performing blocking pops from the sharded LIST
  • A.1 Installation on Debian or Ubuntu Linux
  • A.2 Installing on OS X
  • B.1 Forums for help
  • B.4 Data visualization and recording
  • Buy the paperback

    1.1.2 Other Features

    When using an in-memory database like Redis, one of the first questions that’s asked is “What happens when my server gets turned off?” Redis has two different forms of persistence available for writing in-memory data to disk in a compact format. The first method is a point-in-time dump either when certain conditions are met (a number of writes in a given period) or when one of the two dump-to-disk commands is called. The other method uses an append-only file that writes every command that alters data in Redis to disk as it happens. Depending on how careful you want to be with your data, append-only writing can be configured to never sync, sync once per second, or sync at the completion of every operation. We’ll discuss these persistence options in more depth in chapter 4.

    Even though Redis is able to perform well, due to its in-memory design there are situations where you may need Redis to process more read queries than a single Redis server can handle. To support higher rates of read performance (along with handling failover if the server that Redis is running on crashes), Redis supports master/slave replication where slaves connect to the master and receive an initial copy of the full database. As writes are performed on the master, they’re sent to all connected slaves for updating the slave datasets in real time. With continuously updated data on the slaves, clients can then connect to any slave for reads instead of making requests to the master. We’ll discuss Redis slaves more thoroughly in chapter 4.