Chapter 4: Keeping data safe and ensuring performance

  • Redis in Action – Home
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Part 1: Getting Started
  • Part 2: Core concepts
  • 1.3.1 Voting on articles
  • 1.3.2 Posting and fetching articles
  • 1.3.3 Grouping articles
  • 4.2.1 Configuring Redis for replication
  • 4.2.2 Redis replication startup process
  • 4.2.3 Master/slave chains
  • 4.2.4 Verifying disk writes
  • 5.1 Logging to Redis
  • 5.2 Counters and statistics
  • 5.3 IP-to-city and -country lookup
  • 5.4 Service discovery and configuration
  • 5.1.1 Recent logs
  • 5.1.2 Common logs
  • 5.2.2 Storing statistics in Redis
  • 5.3.1 Loading the location tables
  • 5.3.2 Looking up cities
  • 5.4.1 Using Redis to store configuration information
  • 5.4.2 One Redis server per application component
  • 5.4.3 Automatic Redis connection management
  • 8.1.1 User information
  • 8.1.2 Status messages
  • 9.1.1 The ziplist representation
  • 9.1.2 The intset encoding for SETs
  • Chapter 10: Scaling Redis
  • Chapter 11: Scripting Redis with Lua
  • 10.1 Scaling reads
  • 10.2 Scaling writes and memory capacity
  • 10.3 Scaling complex queries
  • 10.2.2 Creating a server-sharded connection decorator
  • 10.3.1 Scaling search query volume
  • 10.3.2 Scaling search index size
  • 10.3.3 Scaling a social network
  • 11.1.1 Loading Lua scripts into Redis
  • 11.1.2 Creating a new status message
  • 11.2 Rewriting locks and semaphores with Lua
  • 11.3 Doing away with WATCH/MULTI/EXEC
  • 11.4 Sharding LISTs with Lua
  • 11.5 Summary
  • 11.2.1 Why locks in Lua?
  • 11.2.2 Rewriting our lock
  • 11.2.3 Counting semaphores in Lua
  • 11.4.1 Structuring a sharded LIST
  • 11.4.2 Pushing items onto the sharded LIST
  • 11.4.4 Performing blocking pops from the sharded LIST
  • A.1 Installation on Debian or Ubuntu Linux
  • A.2 Installing on OS X
  • B.1 Forums for help
  • B.4 Data visualization and recording
  • Buy the paperback
  • Redis in Action – Home
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Part 1: Getting Started
  • Part 2: Core concepts
  • 1.3.1 Voting on articles
  • 1.3.2 Posting and fetching articles
  • 1.3.3 Grouping articles
  • 4.2.1 Configuring Redis for replication
  • 4.2.2 Redis replication startup process
  • 4.2.3 Master/slave chains
  • 4.2.4 Verifying disk writes
  • 5.1 Logging to Redis
  • 5.2 Counters and statistics
  • 5.3 IP-to-city and -country lookup
  • 5.4 Service discovery and configuration
  • 5.1.1 Recent logs
  • 5.1.2 Common logs
  • 5.2.2 Storing statistics in Redis
  • 5.3.1 Loading the location tables
  • 5.3.2 Looking up cities
  • 5.4.1 Using Redis to store configuration information
  • 5.4.2 One Redis server per application component
  • 5.4.3 Automatic Redis connection management
  • 8.1.1 User information
  • 8.1.2 Status messages
  • 9.1.1 The ziplist representation
  • 9.1.2 The intset encoding for SETs
  • Chapter 10: Scaling Redis
  • Chapter 11: Scripting Redis with Lua
  • 10.1 Scaling reads
  • 10.2 Scaling writes and memory capacity
  • 10.3 Scaling complex queries
  • 10.2.2 Creating a server-sharded connection decorator
  • 10.3.1 Scaling search query volume
  • 10.3.2 Scaling search index size
  • 10.3.3 Scaling a social network
  • 11.1.1 Loading Lua scripts into Redis
  • 11.1.2 Creating a new status message
  • 11.2 Rewriting locks and semaphores with Lua
  • 11.3 Doing away with WATCH/MULTI/EXEC
  • 11.4 Sharding LISTs with Lua
  • 11.5 Summary
  • 11.2.1 Why locks in Lua?
  • 11.2.2 Rewriting our lock
  • 11.2.3 Counting semaphores in Lua
  • 11.4.1 Structuring a sharded LIST
  • 11.4.2 Pushing items onto the sharded LIST
  • 11.4.4 Performing blocking pops from the sharded LIST
  • A.1 Installation on Debian or Ubuntu Linux
  • A.2 Installing on OS X
  • B.1 Forums for help
  • B.4 Data visualization and recording
  • Buy the paperback

    Chapter 4: Keeping data safe and ensuring performance

    This chapter covers

    • Persisting data to disk
    • Replicating data to other machines
    • Dealing with system failures
    • Redis transactions
    • Non-transactional pipelines
    • Diagnosing performance issues

    In the last few chapters, you’ve learned about the variety of commands available in Redis and how they manipulate structures, and you’ve even solved a few problems using Redis. This chapter will prepare you for building real software with Redis by showing you how to keep your data safe, even in the face of system failure, and I’ll point out methods that you can use to improve Redis performance while preserving data integrity.

    We’ll start by exploring the various Redis persistence options available to you for getting your data on disk. We’ll then talk about the use of replication to keep up-to-date copies of your data on additional machines for both performance and data reliability. Combining replication and persistence, we’ll talk about trade-offs you may need to make, and we’ll walk through a few examples of choosing persistence and replication options to suit your needs. We’ll then talk about Redis transactions and pipelines, and we’ll finish out the chapter by discussing how to diagnose some performance issues.

    As we go through this chapter, our focus is understanding more about how Redis works so that we can first ensure that our data is correct, and then work toward making our operations on the data fast.

    To start, let’s examine how Redis stores our information on disk so that, after restart, it’s still there.