Redis Announces CEO Transition

7.5 Summary

  • Redis in Action – Home
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Part 1: Getting Started
  • Part 2: Core concepts
  • 1.3.1 Voting on articles
  • 1.3.2 Posting and fetching articles
  • 1.3.3 Grouping articles
  • 4.2.1 Configuring Redis for replication
  • 4.2.2 Redis replication startup process
  • 4.2.3 Master/slave chains
  • 4.2.4 Verifying disk writes
  • 5.1 Logging to Redis
  • 5.2 Counters and statistics
  • 5.3 IP-to-city and -country lookup
  • 5.4 Service discovery and configuration
  • 5.1.1 Recent logs
  • 5.1.2 Common logs
  • 5.2.2 Storing statistics in Redis
  • 5.3.1 Loading the location tables
  • 5.3.2 Looking up cities
  • 5.4.1 Using Redis to store configuration information
  • 5.4.2 One Redis server per application component
  • 5.4.3 Automatic Redis connection management
  • 8.1.1 User information
  • 8.1.2 Status messages
  • 9.1.1 The ziplist representation
  • 9.1.2 The intset encoding for SETs
  • Chapter 10: Scaling Redis
  • Chapter 11: Scripting Redis with Lua
  • 10.1 Scaling reads
  • 10.2 Scaling writes and memory capacity
  • 10.3 Scaling complex queries
  • 10.2.2 Creating a server-sharded connection decorator
  • 10.3.1 Scaling search query volume
  • 10.3.2 Scaling search index size
  • 10.3.3 Scaling a social network
  • 11.1.1 Loading Lua scripts into Redis
  • 11.1.2 Creating a new status message
  • 11.2 Rewriting locks and semaphores with Lua
  • 11.3 Doing away with WATCH/MULTI/EXEC
  • 11.4 Sharding LISTs with Lua
  • 11.5 Summary
  • 11.2.1 Why locks in Lua?
  • 11.2.2 Rewriting our lock
  • 11.2.3 Counting semaphores in Lua
  • 11.4.1 Structuring a sharded LIST
  • 11.4.2 Pushing items onto the sharded LIST
  • 11.4.4 Performing blocking pops from the sharded LIST
  • A.1 Installation on Debian or Ubuntu Linux
  • A.2 Installing on OS X
  • B.1 Forums for help
  • B.4 Data visualization and recording
  • Buy the paperback
  • Redis in Action – Home
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • Part 1: Getting Started
  • Part 2: Core concepts
  • 1.3.1 Voting on articles
  • 1.3.2 Posting and fetching articles
  • 1.3.3 Grouping articles
  • 4.2.1 Configuring Redis for replication
  • 4.2.2 Redis replication startup process
  • 4.2.3 Master/slave chains
  • 4.2.4 Verifying disk writes
  • 5.1 Logging to Redis
  • 5.2 Counters and statistics
  • 5.3 IP-to-city and -country lookup
  • 5.4 Service discovery and configuration
  • 5.1.1 Recent logs
  • 5.1.2 Common logs
  • 5.2.2 Storing statistics in Redis
  • 5.3.1 Loading the location tables
  • 5.3.2 Looking up cities
  • 5.4.1 Using Redis to store configuration information
  • 5.4.2 One Redis server per application component
  • 5.4.3 Automatic Redis connection management
  • 8.1.1 User information
  • 8.1.2 Status messages
  • 9.1.1 The ziplist representation
  • 9.1.2 The intset encoding for SETs
  • Chapter 10: Scaling Redis
  • Chapter 11: Scripting Redis with Lua
  • 10.1 Scaling reads
  • 10.2 Scaling writes and memory capacity
  • 10.3 Scaling complex queries
  • 10.2.2 Creating a server-sharded connection decorator
  • 10.3.1 Scaling search query volume
  • 10.3.2 Scaling search index size
  • 10.3.3 Scaling a social network
  • 11.1.1 Loading Lua scripts into Redis
  • 11.1.2 Creating a new status message
  • 11.2 Rewriting locks and semaphores with Lua
  • 11.3 Doing away with WATCH/MULTI/EXEC
  • 11.4 Sharding LISTs with Lua
  • 11.5 Summary
  • 11.2.1 Why locks in Lua?
  • 11.2.2 Rewriting our lock
  • 11.2.3 Counting semaphores in Lua
  • 11.4.1 Structuring a sharded LIST
  • 11.4.2 Pushing items onto the sharded LIST
  • 11.4.4 Performing blocking pops from the sharded LIST
  • A.1 Installation on Debian or Ubuntu Linux
  • A.2 Installing on OS X
  • B.1 Forums for help
  • B.4 Data visualization and recording
  • Buy the paperback

    7.5 Summary

    In this chapter, you’ve learned how to perform basic searching using SET operations, and then ordered the results based on either values in HASHes, or potentially composite values with ZSETs. You continued through the steps necessary to build and update information in an ad-targeting network, and you finished with job searching that turned the idea of scoring search results on its head.

    Though the problems introduced in this chapter may have been new, one thing that you should’ve gotten used to by now is Redis’s ability to help you solve an unexpectedly wide variety of problems. With the data modeling options available in other databases, you really only have one tool to work with. But with Redis, the five data structures and pub/sub are an entire toolbox for you to work with.

    In the next chapter, we’ll continue to use Redis HASHes and ZSETs as building blocks in our construction of a fully functional Twitter clone.